Will the new year be “new”?

To borrow a phrase from my TV friends in Midsomer, I am delighted to see the back of 2017. Really. This past year has been a rollercoaster of highs and lows that has left me (us, really) exhausted. From the wonderful get-away to South Carolina to my loving wife’s terrible health problems; from visits with our great-grandchildren to our daughter’s health problems; from increased time with two beloved people at our meeting place in Mercer to the final demise of an old  and loved car (and its replacement with a lump), there has been no smooth, carefree time all year.

It seems nothing, even the simplest, most straight forward of events had their twists and turns. I underwent cataract surgery in both eyes – one of the most common procedures for people of my age. Only I had an allergic reaction to the medicine (drops) they use to heal the eyes, and spent inordinate time clearing the allergy. I got a good deal on glasses (I still need them for reading) and got free no-line bifocals. Except I’ve never had the “no-line” lenses before and over a month later the blur between clear top and prescription bottoms is driving me crazy. I use the glasses as seldom as possible be cause that annoying blur actually makes me nauseous and effects my balance.

My wife was especially strained last year. She’s had extensive trouble getting some medications balanced – by trial and error – and is only now beginning to see an improvement in her comfort levels. Our daughter, whom she is especially close with had problems earlier, and has just recently moved out of our area. Marge has lost her best friend, and that combined with these other problems has left her depressed and needing a fresh start, of sorts. I call it reinventing one’s self, and she is definitely in need of it.

I, myself, find even familiar things backfired in 2017. The Erie weather is something I’ve long defended and loved about my home. But with my job (delivering prescriptions) I find that the beautiful white scenery of this last winter blast has me slogging through snow up to my ample butt, up steps left icy and clogged, and even kicking mounds of snow away from doors so that customers can get their doors open to sign for their deliveries.

And finally, I’ve been burning to write several blogs on subjects that I have had to re-think and set aside because what effects me also effects others, and sometimes violates their right to privacy. As the months dragged on in the midst of all of these travails, I’ve scrapped at least four urgent posts because I had no right to disclose other peoples’ misfortunes. Even now I’m anxiously awaiting news that my dear daughter-in-law has finally fully recovered from a delicate surgery. It’s not my place to write about it, other than to send her all the love and prayers I can and let her know I’m pulling for her.

So,  the question remains: will the new year really be “new”, or more of the same? There’s no way to truly know, but with all the ups and downs, and twists on the expected, I don’t see how 2018 could possibly be an extension of the 2017 course. We didn’t even play a Kflembeauski Cup tourney last year, and that can’t be tolerated. Oddly, I usually mark the years from my birthday (in August) and it’s sometimes hard to think of January 1st as an end to the old and a beginning of the new. But this year I can’t wait to start afresh!

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4 thoughts on “Will the new year be “new”?

  1. Good job! 1918 will be a great year. Thanks for sharing yourself with us. You have a gift of being able to give us hope in the midst of turmoil. Keep looking ahead and up. Peace! Dale

    Liked by 1 person

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